Mastering the BYOD trend

IT admins have questions about the influx of personal smartphones and tablets in the enterprise. They worry about it. And they often need help figuring out what to do about bring your own device (BYOD) management, security and application delivery.

It takes a combination of technology, policy and organization-wide strategy to maximize the benefits of a BYOD program and minimize the risks. This guide explains the basics and offers helpful, in-depth tips for admins stuck at any level of a BYOD program.

Understanding consumer device management and BYOD

Organizations can’t just dive into BYOD without having the proper groundwork in place. You need to understand why BYOD started, where it’s going, what the risks are and how to address consumer device management.

With BYOD, it’s important to start on the right foot. If you’re adopting BYOD simply because you see it as a money-saver, you might be unpleasantly surprised. And if you think BYOD is just about end users, you might find that it’s more IT-focused than you realized.

BYOD basics

Bringing BYOD to the enterprise
Your employees want to bring their devices to work. In fact, they probably already are. Bringing BYOD to your organization can be good for IT and users alike, but there need to be clear policies and consumer device management tools so admins can manage and secure enterprise data, no matter who owns the devices.

Making a BYOD program work
If you want your BYOD program to work, you can’t just slap it together. Before you implement, make sure you’ve planned well, developed policies and put together a security strategy.

BYOD FAQ: Answers to IT’s burning questions
BYOD isn’t an easy thing to roll out, maintain or manage. But the answers in this BYOD FAQ can help you get a handle on application control, consumer device management, acceptable use policies, app delivery options — including cloud storage and enterprise app stores — and how to create a BYOD policy.

Taking advantage of BYOD

An opportunity for IT evolution
Most of the time you hear about all the risks and management headaches around BYOD, but behind all those problems is a chance for IT evolution. Not since the ’90s have admins had the chance to make this big a change, and BYOD is just that chance. It’s less about embracing devices and more about looking to the future of the IT landscape.

How IT can learn to stop worrying and love BYOD: An MDM FAQ
By now, users bringing devices to work is old news. What’s on IT’s mind is mobile device management (MDM), which can be a great option for managing personal devices. Of course, you’ll have some questions about consumer device management on Android and iOS devices and which MDM features to choose. Find the answers in this MDM FAQ.

Supporting BYOD customers with cloud: Defining Workplace as a Service
Workplace as a Service (WaaS) is the cloud provider response to BYOD. It uses the cloud to bring the office to workers, wherever they are. WaaS options let workers access the apps and data they need in ways that are appropriate for their location, the organization’s security requirements and device type.

Want control over BYOD and the cloud? Check out Identity as a Service tools
Everyone who isn’t already using the cloud is moving there, so IT needs new ways to provide identity management and application delivery. That’s where Identity as a Service tools come in. With IDaaS, users get a single sign-on to the cloud through a third-party provider, which means IT doesn’t have to manage tons of logins.

Simplifying BYOD device management with VDI
IT departments that use virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) to give BYOD users access to virtual desktops say the consumer device management benefits they reap outweigh any cons. VDI is more secure than are physical desktops, and it allows users to connect to their desktops from any device.

BYOD gotchas

Creating a bring-your-own-device policy
If IT and management don’t create a BYOD policy, they’re just asking for management and security nightmares. When you’re crafting your bring-your-own-device policy, make sure you consider acceptable use, device selection, reimbursement, applications and security. And don’t forget to write agreements for users to review and sign.

BYOD policy 101: Defining and enforcing a successful program
Even the most basic BYOD policy requires a section that defines the rules and another section on how the organization will enforce them. You might already have the tools you need to enforce your policies; ActiveSync is a popular option, as are third-party apps.

Create and enforce a bring-your-own-device policy

Once the BYOD movement has reached your organization, it’s important to set up a bring-your-own-device policy and a mobile device security policy. Users need to know up front what they can and can’t do with their devices.

When a bring-your-own-device policy is in place and users know what’s expected of them, they also know the consequences for not complying. With an acceptable use policy and a mobile device security policy, IT and upper management can lay out the rules and hold users accountable for their actions.

BYOD policy basics

Creating a bring-your-own-device policy
If IT and management don’t create a BYOD policy, they’re just asking for management and security nightmares. When you’re crafting your bring-your-own-device policy, make sure you consider acceptable use, device selection, reimbursement, applications and security. And don’t forget to write agreements for users to review and sign.

BYOD policy 101: Defining and enforcing a successful program
Even the most basic BYOD policy requires a section that defines the rules and another section on how the organization will enforce them. You might already have the tools you need to enforce your policies; ActiveSync is a popular option, as are third-party apps.

BYOD security policies

BYOD security policy at heart of personal device security
You might think that mobile device management (MDM) is at the core of BYOD security, but it’s only as good as the BYOD security policy that lays the foundation. MDM can help you manage devices, but with a mobile device security policy, users can go to bat for IT.

Put BYOD risks to bed with a mobile device security policy
Experts say that organizations need to put together formal mobile device security policies before looking into MDM systems. The risks of BYOD are many. Having policies set up and doing your research on MDM will ensure that IT manages devices effectively.

Hot topics: Mobile security, bring-your-own-device policy issues
Breaking news: IT departments are worried about securing employees’ smartphones and tablets. Ok, so it’s not really breaking news, but mobile security and BYOD policy issues, such as malware threats and app security, are still without easy or comprehensive solutions.

Using VMware View 5 to address BYOD policy security challenges
Even if your company has a BYOD security policy, mobile devices can pose serious security challenges. IT should be ready to address them and can do so with VMware View 5, which lets admins virtualize desktops. When users access their desktops from mobile devices, it lessens the risk of data loss.

Data access control, MDM tamp BYOD security risks

No one can blame IT for being concerned about BYOD security risks. There are so many to contend with that it can be hard for admins to know where to start.

Bring your own device (BYOD) security policies, acceptable use policies, data access control, mobile device management (MDM) and even the cloud can help put a stop to some of admins’ nail-biting.

Best mobile device security practices for BYOD
The knee-jerk reaction to consumer and otherwise “unsecure” technology in the enterprise has always been to block access. But thanks to BYOD and tech-savvy users, admins are realizing that a better response is to enable safe access. In that case, you’ll need to teach your users mobile device security best practices.

Data access control methods tackle BYOD security risks
Worrying about security is just part of an admin’s job. Virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI) and data access control can solve some of your BYOD security snags. With VDI, apps are hosted in the data center, which protects them from attacks. Outgoing data can still be compromised, however, so you’ll want to have data access control methods on deck.

Cloud services, BYOD bring conflicting reactions to BYOD security risks
BYOD and the cloud often make admins worried, but IT can actually use cloud services to regain some control over employees’ devices. Security as a Service products scan data for malware before it ever reaches a device. Because they’re cloud-based, they come with no server, software or maintenance costs for the company.

Using private cloud to alleviate BYOD security risks
Putting security management in a private cloud can make keeping malware and malicious attacks at bay easier for IT. It can also encourage employees to adhere to your organization’s policies, lessening your risks of running into BYOD security issues.

Acceptable use policies, app control improve BYOD success
In a BYOD environment, acceptable use policies can ensure that admins have control over security and app control, which is good for lessening BYOD security risks. You can use application blacklisting and whitelisting, data access control methods and/or MDM to enforce your acceptable use policies.

Addressing BYOD security with acceptable use agreements
Admins can use acceptable use agreements to inform employees of the risks of circumventing IT blocks, and to tell users what will happen if they don’t comply. Enforcing agreements with MDM, network and data access control helps keep users complaint, especially if they know you’re monitoring their devices.

BYOD woes: App management, licensing, compliance

Writing policies and dealing with security predicaments are just the start of IT’s BYOD troubles: Admins have to find ways to handle a bunch of other difficulties, too. Issues with bandwidth, mobile printing, app management and compliance have been known to rear their heads.

The more prepared IT is to deal with these issues, the more smoothly your bring your own device (BYOD) program can run. Get familiar with the BYOD problems that could be on your horizon.

BYOD taxes wireless network bandwidth
The bring your own device trend causes troubles for IT admins, but it also strains corporate wireless network bandwidth. For some companies, the answer has been to upgrade security and add bandwidth.

Mobile printing and BYOD won’t play nice
First users want to bring devices to work, then they want to print from them. What’s an IT pro to do when BYOD and printing won’t mesh? Wait for Google, Apple and Microsoft to offer to improve their mobile printing offerings, of course!

BYOD good for wireless LAN market, WLAN design
Just as IT has to evolve in the wake of BYOD, so too does wireless LAN design. An influx of devices means more traffic and endpoints, forcing design changes and driving up equipment sales. And that’s a good thing for the WLAN market.

Content management pressure rises, BYOD to blame
Content management is becoming more difficult for managers and IT pros. New devices mean new access points, and users are working on documents from different apps and OSes. Now IT has to worry about supporting multiple operating systems without losing documents.

Mobile cloud apps, BYOD create licensing compliance
Microsoft licensing agreements don’t account for employees’ use of personal cloud services or mobile devices. Be proactive and vigilant about app management and look after what your users are doing on mobile devices, and you can avoid licensing compliance issues .

Native vs. Web: what’s best for IT app management?
It’s no surprise that admins prefer Web apps. They’re easier to secure and manage than native apps. Unfortunately, employees like native apps for their superior user experience, so IT has to find ways to deal.

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